| 0 comments ]

The Amazing Comeback of  Peter Parker


We've always known that Spider-Man's most important conflict has been within himself: the struggle between the ordinary obligations of Peter Parker and the extraordinary responsibilities of Spider-Man. But in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Peter Parker finds that his greatest battle is about to begin. It's great to be Spider-Man (Andrew Garfield). For Peter Parker, there's no feeling quite like swinging between skyscrapers, embracing being the hero, and spending time with Gwen (Emma Stone). But being Spider-Man comes at a price: only Spider-Man can protect his fellow New Yorkers from the formidable villains that threaten the city. With the emergence of Electro (Jamie Foxx), Peter must confront a foe far more powerful than he. And as his old friend, Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), returns, Peter comes to realize that all of his enemies have one thing in common: Oscorp. Directed by Marc Webb. Produced by Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach. Screenplay by Alex Kurtzman & Roberto Orci & Jeff Pinkner.

Childhood heroes never die, they simply outgrow us, outlive us, and transfer their attentions to the generations that follow. Even Spider-Man, whom I loved as a kid, has now long since moved on. He's taken the Hollywood shilling, embraced three-dimensions and pitched himself squarely at the multiplex crowd. By rights it should be all over between us.




Yet The Amazing Spider-Man 2 turns out to be so savvy, punchy and dashing that it won't be denied. It's the thread that won't break and the yarn which still binds. Marc Webb's spring blockbuster is the sequel to the reboot of the movie adaptation of the original Marvel comic-books, which is another way of saying it's a copy of a copy. But if the Spider-Man tale is about anything, it's about gawky youth and surging powers. And the film-makers know this and keep the tone skittish and fresh. In this they are again helped by the perfect casting of Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker; he looks whelpish and raw, as though he's still filling out. I also like the way that, despite the reputed $200m budget, there remains an endearingly amateur quality to Spider-Man's crime-fighting antics. Here is a superhero who occasionally travels to work with a heavy cold. He is not above riding to the rescue of a bullied schoolboy or humiliating a Russian gangster by pulling down his pants. Garfield's gallant web-slinger may be out in the world and halfway up a building, but he clearly still has one foot in the locker room at high school.

Given that the sequel marks Spider-Man's sophomore mission, it follows that the script will deliver sterner tests and added emotional entanglements. On this occasion, Parker breaks up with Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone), who refuses to share him with his costumed alter-ego and prepares to light out for a new life in England. If that weren't enough, he must also contend with a brace of fledgling super-villains in sickly Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), a putative Green Goblin, and downtrodden Max Dillon (Jamie Foxx), who flicks a switch and becomes Electro. It should be noted that neither Harry or Max especially want to be criminals. It's more that they feel hurt and betrayed and appear to stumble on wickedness as a last resort. Marvel's moral universe always was more nuanced than that inhabited by the stolid likes of Superman.


In a perfect world, we're guessing, Spider-Man and Electro may even have been friends. All being well, Electro could have been loved and respected and not set off every car alarm on every street he walks down, thereby probably making himself the most hated man in New York before he commits his first crime. But sadly it is not to be. Near the end, superhero and supervillain proceed to square off in pitched battle inside the pitch-black city, while the Goblin clears his throat backstage. Gwen Stacy, true to form, watches anxiously from the wings.

0 comments

Post a Comment

 
Sammy Feliciano